Tag Archives: safety

drowning-prevention-tips-from-parents-for-parents-and-anyone-who-cares-about-kids

Drowning prevention tips from parents, for parents (and anyone who cares about kids)

Do you have kids? Or grand-kids? Or nieces and nephews? If so, this post is for you – it has valuable information about keeping those beloved kids safe in and around water. And even if you don’t have kids yourself but you simply frequent pools and beaches in the summer, we encourage you to take note, too. We offer useful tips to keep kids safe from people who know.

First, we point to a popular prior blog post that contains useful information that many people didn’t know: ” We are conditioned by movies and pop culture to think that a drowning person would yell and wave for help and splash violently to get attention. In reality, drowning is a quiet, desperate event – so quiet that every year, children die in pools and water just feet away from parents or friends who do not recognize the signs of distress.”

Drowning doesn’t look like what we see in the movies

We’ve also recently come across a few useful articles featuring Moms who offer great advice about protecting kids from downing. One mother, sadly, gained her expertise the hard way after the drowning death of her toddler. The other Mom gained her expertise in her job investigating drowning deaths as her job.

In A Layered Approach to Preventing Drowning, Nicole Hughes shares her sad experience and the lessons she learned from her 3-year old son Levi’s drowning death:

“Our son drowned when there were six physicians in the room, 12 adults, 17 kids,” said his mother, Nicole Hughes, a writing teacher and literacy coach in Bristol, Tenn., who now works extensively in drowning prevention, including with the American Academy of Pediatrics.

“Everything I read about drowning before Levi died, it was like background noise,” Ms. Hughes said. “We think it’s happening to neglectful parents” who don’t watch their children when they’re swimming. But as she learned after Levi’s death, for most toddlers who drown, it doesn’t happen in the context of time spent “swimming” — that is, time they’re known to be in the water. And drowning is the leading cause of preventable deaths in children from 1 to 4.”

In addition to offering great advice for parents to raise awareness, the article also points to a helpful  Drowning Prevention Toolkit from American Academy of Pediatrics.

The second article offers water safety tips for parents from Natalie Livingston, a Mom who investigates drownings in her role as vice president of Oostman Aquatic Safety Consulting. She knows what she is talking about – she “spent 25 years as a lifeguard and worked as the general manager of a water park for 10 years. She trains lifeguards, consults in both private and public operations, and is hired as an expert witness in drowning cases.”

Livingston lists 10 in-depth, practical tips with advice that you might not think about, tips that she applies to her own children. For example, would you think to teach your child how to escape the grip of a struggling, panicked person? Or raise awareness about water depth in practical terms they can understand? Those are among the many lessons she offers.  You can also follow Livingston on Facebook at Aquatic Safety Connection for more tips. Her tips have gone viral online, and she was recently featured on Good Morning America. Take the time to check them out!

In addition to Livingston’s tips, the article offers these additional water safety recommendations:

  • Swim Lessons Save Lives
  • Learn CPR — Drowning patients need oxygen — give air first!
  • USCG approved lifejackets only — no arm floaties or inflatables
  • Designate A Water Watcher / Swim with a Lifeguard
  • Always use pool barriers and layers of protection
  • Enter the water feet first
  • No running
  • Stay hydrated / protect yourself from the sun
  • No drugs / alcohol
  • All water is dangerous — even inches
  • Always swim with a buddy
  • Lost / Missing kids — always check the water first

See related posts on pool safety:
Swimming pool and spa safety issues and insurance coverage

Pool & spa owners: Minimize your risk with simple steps for safety

Reprinted from Renaissance Alliance – no usage without permission.

summer-safety-preventing-tick-related-illnesses

Summer safety: Preventing tick-related illnesses

Sorry to put a damper on your summer, but we’re in prime tick season right now. If you like spending time in the great outdoors, there are some steps you should take to stay safe from tick-related illnesses, which can be very serious.

Disease carrying ticks are found in all 50 states. In northern and New England states with a high deer population, black-legged ticks — also known as deer ticks — are a great menace because they can transmit Lyme disease.  But don’t be fooled into thinking that the risk of Lyme Disease is confined to the North – deer ticks can be found in all states and as weather patterns shift, tick populations are shifting, too. In the south, dog ticks and Gulf Coast ticks that carry Rocky Mountain Spotted fever and Lone Star ticks that cause meat allergies are more common. (see Ticks and Diseases in Florida)

Wherever you live, some of the most important steps in preventing tick-related diseases are knowing where and when tick encounters are most likely to happen, knowing how to dress to prevent ticks and checking yourself, your kids and your pets after outdoor activities to remove any ticks. What type of activities? Gardening, hiking, golfing, camping, walking the dog, playing in the yard … any outdoor activities, particularly those that occur in or near wooded areas.

One resource for tips on preventing tick related problems is from the University of Rhode Island. Check out the site called the TickEncounter Resource Center, with lots of great information on tick identification and removal, as well as tips for your protection, for treating your yard, and protecting your pets. It has a lot of information about the various types of ticks and diseases that they carry.

One of their primary recommendations for preventing ticks is dressing appropriately. They offer this reminder:

“What you wear when working or playing could reduce your chances of tick bites. Remember: Ticks start LOW and crawl UP; ticks do not jump, fly or drop from trees, they are down on the ground and crawl up until they find a good spot to attach. Tucking pant legs into socks is a good way to keep ticks on the outside where they may be seen or get brushed off.”

Another important thing is to make sure that after outdoor activities, you do a thorough tick check –if you can catch a tick and remove it early you can prevent disease because according to the CDC, it generally takes 36-48 hours of attachment before disease is spread.  The CDC suggests using a hand-held or full-length mirror to view all parts of your body. Ticks are great at hiding, they like warm, moist areas of the body such as the scalp, armpits and groin. Their bit is painless. The CDC says to check these parts of your body and your child’s body for ticks.

illustration on what body parts to check for ticks

 

Also, be sure to check your pets and your clothes and gear. The CDC says:

Tumble dry clothes in a dryer on high heat for 10 minutes to kill ticks on dry clothing after you come indoors. If the clothes are damp, additional time may be needed. If the clothes require washing first, hot water is recommended. Cold and medium temperature water will not kill ticks.

 

The Center by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) offers more tick resources, including prevention, information on tick removal information and more as well as Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever resources.

For local alerts on ticks and other season health issues, check your state health department. Many states have created specific tick-related resources such as the ones we cite above from Florida and Rhode Island. These can be found by simply entering “ticks your state” name in Google.

 

 

Reprinted from Renaissance Alliance – no usage without permission.

whats-most-likely-to-kill-you-check-out-your-odds-for-national-safety-month

What’s most likely to kill you? Check out your odds for National Safety Month

It’s National Safety Month, which is a great time double down on safety both at work and at home. But where to start? One way to think about safety practices and injury prevention is to focus on the types of injuries that are most common and most likely. With the summer approaching, expect that any day now we will start seeing alarming stories about shark danger. While no one wants to get attacked by a shark and it’s certainly good to take precautions, in reality, there’s a greater chance you will die by choking on your lobster roll than by being eaten by a shark. Media attention to sensational stories about crime, disasters and unusual tragedies tend to distort our sense of what the real risks we face actually are.

The National Safety Council puts things in perspective in this short video:

The purpose of insurance is to offer you financial protection from accidental risks and calamities that may befall you. But even when you are properly insured, it’s still in your best interests to try to manage those risks as best you can because insurance may not make you whole – particularly when the risk involves life and limb. We often don’t do a good job of managing our risks. Sometimes, what we fear the most is actually less risky than other common every day occurrences. Human nature being what it is, people often worry more about rare events and can be too casual about dangers that are more pervasive.

Learn the top causes of unintentional injury and death in your homes and communities from the National Safety Council, or see this chart and learn more on Mortality and Risk from the Insurance Information Institute.

Plus, check out one of our most popular past posts: What are the odds? Mortality calculators, where we various tools and calculators that let you assess your mortality. Don’t miss one of the web’s longtime favorite sites, the Internet Death Clock, where you can calculate optimistic or pessimistic estimates of how much time you are likely to live.

Despite the odds, one sad fact remains: None of us get out of here alive, so as the late Warren Zevon advised, “Enjoy every sandwich.” And as long as you are thinking about odds, it might also be a good time to think about taking care of your survivors:

Life Insurance Survey: Most people have too little.

A few other past posts on the topic of risks and dangers

 

Reprinted from Renaissance Alliance – no usage without permission.

motorcycle-mania-your-spring-guide-to-insurance-safety-training-laws-and-more

Motorcycle Mania: Your spring guide to insurance, safety, training, laws and more

Despite the good news that motorcycle fatalities are trending down in recent years, motorcycle riders still represent a disproportionate share of traffic fatalities. May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, a good time for riders and those who share the road with motorcyclists to double down on safety as we all get ready for the warmer weather and summer road trips. Here’s a guide to important information that you need to be prepared and to ride safely, as well as to comply with licensing, insurance and other legal requirements. .

Motorcycle Laws

If you operate your motorcycle on public roads, you must register it with your appropriate state authority and must be licensed to drive it.

AAA Digest of State Motor Laws – Motorcycles

State-by-State Guide to Motorcycle Laws – helmets, headlights, passengers, noise restrictions and more

III: State Motorcycle Helmet Use Laws (chart form)

State Highway Offices

Motorcycle insurance

Most states require that you carry at least a minimum insurance coverage – Florida, Montana and Washington are exceptions. Those states that do require insurance vary as to coverage requirements; most require a minimum of liability insurance to cover bodily injury and property damage.

Whether required or not, we think it’s pretty risky to go without coverage. Should an accident occur resulting in an injury or property damage, without insurance, you are on the hook. In fact, it is generally worth looking into expanding your coverage beyond the minimum. Options to consider are comprehensive and collision, which would cover other potential losses, such as replacement if your bike were stolen or damaged.. In some states, uninsured/under-insured motorist coverage is required; in others, you may be required to have specific coverage for passengers.

Motorcycle owners sometimes ask if they can cancel insurance in the winter when they aren’t riding but that can be risky and leave you exposed if the bike is stolen. Some insurers offer winter lay-up insurance options.

Talk to your independent insurance agent, who will be able to recommend the best coverage for your local requirements and your particular circumstances. Be sure to ask if there are any discounts that you may qualify for, such as for bundling multiple policies, for being a safe driver, for having participated in training, or any other circumstances.

For more, see the Insurance Information Institute (III): Find the right coverage for your bike

Motorcycle Safety

The Motorcycle Safety Foundation is a valuable resource. It is a not-for-profit resource, internationally recognized for comprehensive, research-based, Rider Education and Training System (RETS), which promotes lifelong-learning for motorcyclists and continuous professional development for certified coaches and trainers. MSF also actively participates in government relations, safety research and public awareness campaigns.

Check for available trainings and download their popular guide, You and Your Motorcycle: Riding Tips. Check out their other guides for three-wheelers, scooters, off-highway riding and more.

III: Background on: Motorcycle crashes

NHTSA: Motorcycle Safety

Choose the right helmet – how to find the right fit for safety

Helmet safety ratings – Make sure your helmet has the DOT symbol on the outside back; this means it meets Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 218.

Motorcycle Industry Council Tire Guide

NHTSA: Safety Issues and Recalls – search by VIN

Additional Resources

How to Prepare your Motorcycle for Spring

Consumer Reports: Motorcycle Buying Guide & Ratings

Motorcycle Club Listings

Reprinted from Renaissance Alliance – no usage without permission.

boat-safety-week-in-two-words-wear-it

Boat Safety Week in two words: Wear It!

It’s National Safe Boating Week May 18-24, a good reminder to all boat owners and boat lovers to review boat safety best practices and to take the “Wear It” Life Jacket Pledge. And if your boat represents a serious investment, it’s also a good time to think about insurance.

Why are life jackets important? In 2017, the Coast Guard counted 4,291 accidents that involved 658 deaths, 2,629 injuries and approximately $46 million dollars of damage to property as a result of recreational boating accidents.

Life jackets may not protect you against property damage, but they will help to save lives. But simply having life jackets on board is not enough – accidents happen too fast to access them. Being a good swimmer isn’t enough – an injury or water-logged clothes can interfere with even the strongest swimmer’s abilities. Another big objection is that jackets are too hot, too restrictive, or don’t look “cool,” but new, lightweight jackets are slimmer, cooler and less restrictive. Plus, as for the coolness factor – bicycle helmets didn’t look cool at one time, until they became a sporting fashion statement. Do your part to make life jackets cool.

The U.S. Coast Guard life jacket requirements for recreational vessels:

  • A wearable life jacket for each person must be aboard
  • Life jackets must be U. S. Coast Guard approved
  • Jackets must be proper size for the intended wearer
  • In good and serviceable condition
  • Properly stowed (readily accessible)

The Coast Guard puts out a brochure that talks about the different types of life jackets and how to ensure a good fit.

Before you take put any boats int he water, make sure you know the federal laws as well as any state laws that might apply. The US Coast Guard offers links and resources on boat regulations and laws, including federal and state laws, navigation rules, and more.

Talk to your independent agent about Boating Insurance

Do you need boat insurance? Your homeowners or renters insurance may cover canoes and small sailboats or powerboats, but larger boats require a separate policy. Talk to your independent agent about the coverage you do have and whether it applies to any boats that you have. Typically, liability coverage would need to be added as an endorsement to a homeowners policy. The Insurance Information Institute offers a good overview of boat and watercraft insurance, as well as safety best practices.

 

Reprinted from Renaissance Alliance – no usage without permission.

national-prescription-drug-take-back-day-april-27

National Prescription Drug Take Back Day: April 27

Do you have expired or unused prescription medicines sitting around in your kitchen or bathroom cabinets? Now you have a safe and anonymous way to dispose of them: National Prescription Drug Take Back Day on April 27.

According to the US Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), unused or expired prescription drug medications are a public safety issue, leading to potential accidental poisonings, misuse and overdose. Too often, unused prescription drugs find their way into the wrong hands. That’s dangerous and often tragic. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs were obtained from family and friends, often from the home medicine cabinet. That’s why it was great to see thousands of folks from across the country clean out their medicine cabinets and turn in – safely and anonymously – a record amount of prescription drugs. During the last Take Back Day in October 2018, more than 457 tons of medications were turned in at more than 5000 collection sites nationwide for proper disposal.

Proper disposal of unused drugs saves lives and saves the environment!

Use the Collection Site Locator – enter your zip code to find a site near you.

If you or someone you love needs help for a prescription drug problem, find treatment using the treatment services locator.

The DEA offers tips for disposal if no disposal instructions are given on the prescription drug label and no prescription drug take-back program is available in your area:

  • You must not share your prescription drugs – they were prescribed to you.
  • Remove the medicine from its original container and mix it with an undesirable substance, such as used coffee grounds or kitty litter.
  • Place the mixture in a sealable bag, empty bag, or other container to prevent medicine from leaking or breaking out of a garbage bag.
  • Scratch out all identifying information on the prescription label to make it unreadable to protect your identity and the privacy of your personal health information.
  • Do not flush medicines down the sink or toilet unless the prescription drug labeling specifically instructs you to do so, and check with your community’s laws and regulations prior to taking such action.

See more in this PDF tip sheet: How to properly dispose of your unused medicines

Reprinted from Renaissance Alliance – no usage without permission.

tips-for-driving-safely-around-large-commercial-vehicles

Tips for driving safely around large commercial vehicles

Any time you are driving your car on the highway or on your city and town roads, you are navigating a vehicle that weighs about 5,000 pounds, while sharing the road with 12.5 million giant commercial vehicles. A fully loaded bus can weigh 30,000 to 44,000 pounds, according to the American Public Transportation Association. And according to The Truckers’ Report, the legal weight for an eighteen wheeler is 80,000 lbs. Plus, factor in any oversize or overweight permits. The length of time to stop an eighteen wheeler is 40% greater than that of an automobile.

How confident are you about your driving skills? Having a collision with any other vehicle is a serious matter, but the stakes are even higher when it comes to collision with a 30 or 40 ton vehicle! There are no mere fender benders in an accident pitting your car against this weight class.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has issued Our Roads, Our Safety, a national safety campaign shaped to raise awareness about sharing the road safely with large trucks and buses. They offer Tips for Passenger Vehicle Drivers, as well as Tips for Bicyclists and Pedestrians, both of which are worth checking out. We found the infographics that illustrate the driver tip list particularly helpful and have reprinted them below. They offer useful visual guides for blind spots and space considerations when driving around large commercial vehicles.

diagram showing how to give trucks extra turning space

diagram showing the stopping distance for large vehicles

Reprinted from Renaissance Alliance – no usage without permission.

Social Media Resolutions for 2017

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Cyber security and identity theft issues are on the rise, and social media makes it more difficult for us to protect our personal information. The internet and social media have made bullying and stalking much easier as well. It is important to keep your own private information, as well as your family and friends, safe while on social media. Here are some tips that will ensure you have a secure online presence.

  1. Think twice about anything you post online. Of course, the whole point of having a social media account is to share information about yourself. Keep in mind anything you share online is difficult to un-share. Just because your account is private does not mean someone you’re friends with cannot share something you’ve posted, so be aware of that as well. A few things to think twice before posting are:
    – Your full birth date
    – Photos with geotag information
    – Rants about your job or sensitive information about your job
    – Travel plans

2. Avoid strangers or untrustworthy people as friends on social media. It may be tempting to accept a Facebook friend request from a pretty stranger. However, it just is not safe to add someone until you know them more and at least build a relationship with them. Think about all the information from the past, present and future they would have access to. It is better to be safe than sorry!

3. Review privacy and security settings on all your social media accounts. Take some time to review all the security settings for each of your social media accounts. In particular, Facebook has many different settings because there are so many ways for your personal information to be shared. Some of the options include choosing whether or not your profile is connected to search engines, who posts to your timeline, and who can contact you. Check out these tips for protecting yourself and your family on social network

Always remember the Internet is a huge place and although we may feel secure on our own social networks, that is not always the case. Connect with those you know, share wisely, and evaluate security settings on all social media accounts!

Contact an agent at Cochrane & Porter for any of your insurance needs! 781-943-1555 or info@cochraneandporter.com

December is National Impaired Driving Prevention Month

Together, we can help keep people safe on the road – every day.

 

december-is-national-impaired-driving-prevention-monthDecember is one of the busiest driving months, which naturally means it’s one of the most dangerous times to drive. Many of us are attending social events and parties that involve alcohol. Data from the National Highway Traffic Administration shows there is a significant increase in DUIs and fatal drunk-driving crashes around this time of year. That is why December has been named National Impaired Driving Prevention Month – to increase awareness about the dangers and consequences associated with driving under the influence of both alcohol and drugs.

There are three forms of impaired driving: distracted driving, drugged driving, and drunk driving. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 28 people in the United States die in motor vehicle crashes each day. This is equivalent to one death every 53 minutes. The annual cost of alcohol-related crashes is more than $44 billion!

The National Association of Drug Court Professionals explains, “Since 1981, every President of the United States has demonstrated the commitment to preventing impaired driving by proclaiming December as national Drunk & Drugged Driving Prevention Month or more recently, National Impaired Driving Prevention Month.”

President Obama states, “This month, let us continue empowering drivers to make responsible decisions and educating the American people on ways they can help keep our roads safe and our futures bright.” Read the full 2016 proclamation here

At Cochrane & Porter, we wish you a happy and safe holiday season, and urge all to remain sober while driving! As always, do not hesitate to contact us for any of your insurance needs.

Cochrane & Porter Insurance Agency
981 Worcester Street
Wellesley, MA 0482
781-943-1555
info@cochraneandporter.com

Weather and travel forecast for Thanksgiving 2016

Your Thanksgiving 2016 Travel & Weather Forecast

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Whether you are hitting the road or welcoming guests to your home, here is some information you may find helpful for this Thanksgiving regarding weather and traveling conditions.

Weather
Wednesday is supposed to be in the mid-40’s, sunny and dry, and we won’t see temperatures above 51 degrees. On Thanksgiving Day, we are supposed to see a light storm pass through – expect to see some clouds and occasional showers. Black Friday will be dry but cold, so be sure to bundle up if you are taking advantage of all those sales! Throughout the weekend we are not expected to see high’s above the mid 50’s.

Best times to travel?
Over 48 million Americans will travel 50 miles or more this year on Thanksgiving, according to AAA. This is roughly one million more travelers than last year!

Information about the best and worst times to travel this Thanksgiving, according to the Boston Patch:

  • The worst day to leave is Wednesday; if you do plan on leaving Wednesday, try and be on the road by 7 am and avoid driving around 3 pm.
  • The best day to return is the day after Thanksgiving (Friday). Traffic is expected to be at its worst around 4 pm — the earlier you leave, the better off you are!
  • The worst day to return is the Saturday after Thanksgiving. Leave by 6 am if you need to travel on this day. 4 pm is when traffic is supposed to be very heavy.

Based on AAA.com bookings, the most popular destinations this Thanksgiving include:

  1. Las Vegas, Nevada
  2. San Francisco, California
  3. San Diego, California
  4. Orlando, Florida
  5. New York City, New York

Make sure to plan ahead and take safety breaks when necessary. It is important to make sure that your vehicle is equipped for your trip as well – Consumer Reports has a checklist of items recommended for holiday road trips.

We wish you a fun, happy and safe Thanksgiving! To those of you who are traveling, be cautious of traffic and make sure not to text and drive! As always, do not hesitate to contact an agent at Cochrane & Porter for any of your insurance needs: 781-943-1555 or info@cochraneandporter.com.

 

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